Culture

Mel Gibson Faces Accusations Over Shelved Maccabee Script

Mel Gibson/Photo © iStock
Mel Gibson/Photo © iStock

A bitter feud has sprung up between Mel Gibson and screenwriter Joe Eszterhas over anti-Semitic slurs that Eszterhas claimed he endured at the hands of Gibson during meetings about the scandal-beleaguered director's Judah Maccabee biopic project. Mel has done everything he can to discredit the screenwriter's complaints, calling them "utter fabrications" and pointing out that he only came forward with them after Warner Brothers declined to buy his script. It's hard to figure out who to believe -- but I take comfort in knowing that for now we're all safe from having to watch that dratted movie.

Your daily motivation arrives today in the form of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'," as spliced together from dozens of movie clips. With Robocop and Wallace Shawn as your copilots, you're sure to make it to the weekend in good spirits.

The 1982 Atari adaptation of "E.T.: The Extraterrestrial" is one of the most notorious video game disasters of all time; legend has it that millions of returned and unsold copies were disposed of en masse in a landfill. The AV Club's Nathan Rabin has laid out the whole story for us, including a vintage TV commercial for the doomed item and a video of actual gameplay. (Makes me appreciate how good I had it growing up with the "Jurassic Park" video game.)

The Bygone Bureau would like to introduce you to H.P. Lovecraft: Advice Columnist. Considering his canon, he'd be a great man for the job -- pretty hard to shock. And if your girlfriend metamorphoses into "a kind of polyhedron with many pairs of feelers, membraneous wings, and fanged orifices on stalks," it's not like Dear Abby is going to be of much help.

  • Rohan

    This incomplete article in few words in the first paragraph is not doing justice to what the article's name is above. A comprehensive report on the subject of Mr. Gibson and Mr. Nobody (Eszterhas) would make a much suitable article. This article clearly indicates that the writer is biased according to the words in the first paragraph.