Culture

Bat Signal: Radio Host Rush Limbaugh Fears Batman Villain 'Bane' Conspiracy

No plans tonight? Perfect! If you're in the NYC area, join me at 92YTribeca for Meet The Lady: Burlesque, where exotic dancing, film, and literature will converge for one night of fun. Author Karen Abbot (American Rose) will be on hand to discuss the film career of iconic stripteaser Gypsy Rose Lee, and you'll see bawdy dance numbers inspired by everything from "Blue Velvet" to Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. As the event's host, I get to keep my clothes on -- but I promise sequins will be involved.

I keep the daily post here politically neutral, okay? But Rush Limbaugh is claiming that the Batman villain Bane (played by Tom Hardy in "The Dark Knight Rises") is being used to brainwash audiences against GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney, and that just doesn't hold water. First of all, Bane wasn't invented until 1993, years before Mitt Romney or a company named Bain Capital were on anyone's radar. Back when Nolan wrote this script, there was no telling who the GOP candidate would be, and anyhow Bane already appeared in the 1997 "Batman and Robin," so it was hardly an out-of-left-field decision to feature him. Clearly the solution is for Limbaugh to watch more movies, read more comics, or befriend more nerds.

Of all the unwarranted sequels out there, the "Finding Nemo" announcement is the one I'm having the hardest time accepting. What could it possibly be about? I mean ... they found him, right? Andrew Stanton, who wrote the original 2003 film, hasn't offered any hints. Please just promise me you won't go all "Fievel Goes West" on us, okay?

Congratulations to my girl Amanda Plummer for landing a role in the "Hunger Games" sequel! You loved her as Honey Bunny in "Pulp Fiction," you admired her weapon-throwing skills in "So I Married an Axe Murderer," and you were happy to see her get arrested when she played Reese Witherspoon's junky mom in "Freeway." Now she'll be playing Wiress, one of Katniss Everdeen's fellow tributes in "Catching Fire."

  • DP

    The theory also assumes voters know that much about the background of those they are voting for. I'm not knocking not knowing that much about the background of who you decide not to vote for, BTW. Sometimes you don't have to dig deep to get to that decision.

Like What You're Reading? Get the best of Signature, delivered to your inbox every week. Join the Signature newsletter